Filed under Sociology

Engaging Students Requires a Renewed Focus on Teaching

Promoting successful student learners requires faculty members to reflect on their own roles as teachers. But while tenured and tenure-track professors routinely share their research interests with one another, frank discussions about teaching remain rare. Relevant and vibrant pedagogical discussions are well established in some fields, such as digital pedagogy and rhetoric and composition, since … Continue reading

A Missionary for the Liberal Arts

From an early age, Leon Botstein’s life was shaped by two powerful forces: fascism and education. His parents fled Nazi persecution in Poland and, after World War II, settled in the United States. Mr. Botstein’s mother and father eventually joined the faculty of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York, leaving an indelible impression … Continue reading

College Students Step Up in Ferguson

The protests that have swept up Ferguson, Mo., following the fatal shooting of Michael Brown, in part have been powered by the young people. Some are local and others have come there to help organize. Antonio Parker, a student at University of Missouri-St. Louis, said that he has been at protests during the day. “When … Continue reading

Single Parents Jeopardizing Retirement Plans to Fund Children’s College Education

How are single parents prioritizing their financial futures? Allianz, a multinational financial services company, asked just that question in the LoveFamilyMoney study looking at how the contemporary American family spends and saves. Many single parents—45 percent—say that they are motivated to create and implement a long-term financial savings plan for their children’s post-secondary education, but … Continue reading

Sociology Jobs Stay Stable, With a Caveat

Pity the poor researchers at the American Sociological Association. Every year they crank out a report—one of the most thorough of its kind—assessing the state of the academic job market in their field. Every year their findings can be characterized in one of two ways: either “downright bleak” or “cause for cautious optimism.” And every … Continue reading

What Men­tors Of­ten Miss

She was a seem­ing­ly qui­et, in­tro­spec­tive stu­dent. On the sur­face, her in­tro­ver­sion didn’t bode well for her suc­cess in my pub­lic-speak­ing course at the Community College of Phil­a­del­phia. While oth­er stu­dents were of­ten loud and more gre­gar­i­ous, she said very lit­tle in class. Nev­er­the­less, I could al­ways tell she was en­gaged. From the way her … Continue reading